Category Archives: technology

Common Curriculum Lesson Planner

Are you tired of plan books? Sick of word documents? Tired of 3 inch binders?  Common Curriculum takes all the frustration of lesson planning away.

If you aren’t amazed by the potential of CommonCurriculum.com after watching the video, then watch it again!

Here is just an abbreviated list of what is possible in Common Curriculum:

Cool Tool – eduCanon

Below is a post from another place that I blog (http://durantroadms.wcpss.net/web/tech/).  I thought I would share it here as well. Enjoy!

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Recently, I hosted a flipped classroom tour at Durant.  We visited Mr. Dunton, Mrs. Holland, Mrs. Miles, Mrs. Desmarais, and Mrs. Myers.  At the end, the tour group sat down with Ms. Hodges, Mrs. Kensmoe, and Mrs. Richardson.  I received a lot of very positive feedback from the group.  They really enjoyed their visit and learned a lot about the flipped classroom from some great teachers!

Now…I tell you all of that…to tell you this.  Teaching is learning, and I learned just as much from them as they did from us.  They shared a lot of great resources and ideas with me.  During that tour, one of their teachers and the principal both mentioned a tool called eduCanon.  It’s a very powerful tool for the flipped classroom or really any classroom interested in incorporating video!

In a nutshell, eduCanon allows you to make any YouTube video into an interactive video lesson.  You can add questions throughout a video that require students to pause the video and answer the questions.   In fact, the video pauses itself and requires students to answer.  This feature helps students to stay focused while watching the video and avoid zoning out.  Students can rewind to review material, but they cannot fast forward to skip the video.  It’s impossible to bypass the questions and just scrub through the video.

Teachers can also assess how much students know as they watch the video.  EduCanon records each student’s answer, ties it directly to their name, and records their grade.  No more need to go around and “check” video notes.  You can log into eduCanon and see which students completed the video, correct or incorrect answers, and grades.  Just transfer the mark into your gradebook based on your grading preferences.  It’s all right there for you!

Check out the video below…and yes…I know Mrs. Covington (formerly known as Ms. Gimbar) is in the video.

Podcast #4 – Online Learning vs. The Traditional Classroom

Listen to Podcast #4

Transcript:

As a traditional 8th grade SS teacher by day and an online graduate student by night, I have first hand experience in the ongoing debate of online classes vs. traditional classes.  I have been convinced that online education is the way to go, and then I live, see, and experience the benefits of traditional classes and I’m back on the fence again.  For the sake of discussion, I see a lot of value in both, and I think more than anything it depends on the student and how they lean.  With a great teacher, a traditional classroom for most students is irreplaceable.

Obviously, there is a lot of value in online education.  Online classes provide a unique opportunity that traditional classes do not.  For example, students can access the material at any time.  In online environments, students can work more at their own pace and have much more time to accomplish various tasks.  Various learning styles can be incorporated into the online curriculum so that many students can be successful at the same activity because they are allowed to demonstrate what they learned in a variety of different ways.  The activities have to be student-centered in online learning.  Also, since students are accessing materials using their own computer more often than not resources are not an issue when teaching and learning.  Students can collaborate in unique ways that are more closely related to 21st century workforce skills.  Students can communicate in ways that are more similar to the communication skills needed to succeed in an ever-connected world.

However, even with all of the pedagogical benefits of online learning, as a current classroom teacher I see and experience so many non-educational benefits of the traditional classroom that I have yet to experience as a student in online environments.  Traditional classrooms – with good teachers – instill students with passion, interests, relationship skills, and a host of other attributes that students need in order to be contributors to our society.  I consider these skills and emotions to be a part of the hidden curriculum of traditional education.  For example, teachers teach students to be organized, confident, passionate, compassionate, etc. or at least we try to.  You would be hard pressed to find those skills taught in just about online environment.

Not too mention, students learn to communicate face to face.  They learn how to read one another and know how to respond and act.  They learn how to troubleshoot social situations.  In traditional classrooms, students learn to cope, prioritize, organize, and succeed.  Sure they can experience some of these things in online environments, but it’s not the same.  Seeing a teacher show how proud they are of a student is not as meaningful as reading comments in an online grade book.  Working with other students face to face and physically getting your hands dirty in a chemistry lab is not the same as simulating a lab in a Google Hangout. 

You see online learning does have a long lasting and much needed place in education.  Students benefit greatly in online learning environments and they need to learn those skills, but nothing will be able to replace the intangibles learned in the classroom. 

Just wait…

My school is ready.  The students love ’em.  The teachers are hungry for ’em.  The administration thinks we need ’em. The PTA is buying ’em.  iPads are here.  My school is slowing moving to a tablet-enriched environment.  Sure…we only have 30 iPads and still hundreds of laptops and computers, but we made the switch.  I was in on the conversation.  I helped make the decision.  Heck…I was the loudest voice of moving towards tablets for student use.  So we did.  Our tech team and principal set down, and we hashed out a plan to buy 30 iPads, 30 cases, a charging station, cart, and macbook pro.  This is the biggest decision – both financially and pedagogically – that I have made (and possibly the entire tech team has made) for my school on behalf of students and staff.

So now what?

We wait…we learn…we study…we plan…we create…we wait…

The deal was too good too pass up.  We had time-restricted money to spend and the choice was iPads or laptops.  But I would be lying to you if I said I wasn’t scared about the decision we made.  So many times we purchase the next hot item because it’s cool, but we have no idea how to use it or worse yet we have great ideas but are afraid to put in the up-front work.  I’m nervous that these iPads will be just that or teachers will see them as a cure or quick fix.  You see I have done my research, and my team did their research.  We really do believe that tablet computing has a strong place in middle school education.  We see how well it can be integrated into a new common core curriculum full of documents, images, resources, etc.  We see how well it can used to enhance a 21st century classroom that simply lacks resources other than textbooks and 4 desktops.  My team believes that tablet computing can be our answer to moving towards a 1:1 environment.

So now what?

We wait…we study…we plan…we create…we wait…

As the resident tech guru at my school, I preach to my colleagues and administrators that just acquiring technology such as iPads, clickers, laptops, or smart boards does not instantly improve classroom instruction.  Just like hiring teachers does not mean they will be good teachers.  Lecturing using a projector and lecturing using iPads where students can flip through the slides is exactly the same.  Technology integration is an artform just as project-based learning and flipping the classroom are artforms.  You cannot just add in iPads and expect magic to happen.  Learning will not improve unless you are prepared to put in a little TLC.

So now what?

We wait…we study…we plan…we create…we wait…

There’s no reason to rush into this.  It’s a marriage.  Technology isn’t going anywhere, and tablet computing has proven it’s place in society and in the classroom.  That’s why it’s important to wait, learn, study, plan, create, and wait.  Our students have to wait for their teachers to be ready to use the iPads.  As a staff, we have to study and put in the time to know what it means to teach in a 1:1 environment and use tablets as effective vehicles of learning.  Our administration team has to plan for the direction we are moving as a school.  Tablets in the classroom are very different from laptops and smarts boards and we need an instructional plan.   As a tech team, we have to create appropriate and meaningful staff development to help our staff feel ready to use iPads effectively and with minimal setbacks.  As a school, we have to wait.  It’s important to wait to make sure we have 100% buy-in.  It’s important to wait to ensure we use the iPads to the best of our abilities and to benefit our students in the best ways.  It’s important to wait, study, plan, and create so that we can teach.